How to Wash a Vegetable

Standard

I frequently say something like wash or scrub vegetable well. What does that really mean?

Heres how:

To wash or not to wash?

I asked my grandmother when she asked me to wash the grapefruit we were about to eat, why she wanted me to do that if we were just going to slice them and eat the inside. She said the juice would get on the outside and into the part we ate. Bubbe knows, made sense to me. Now I wash everything but bananas.

How to wash:

A soft bristled vegetable brush works well. If you don’t have one use a clean scrubby or rough rag dedicated only for vegetables. The softer the flesh, the gemtler the pressure. I barely push at all for a tomato. For a carrot or potato I scrub vigorously especially if they are visibly dirty. Whether you plan to eat the peel, like an apple or carrot, or not,  rub and rinse it well under running water. This will help flush any toxins and pesticides away and down the drain.

And remember: You never need to wash your vegetables in any kind of soap. No dish soap tubbies for the vegetables.

Next Up Thursday:

Quick Breads

How to for Fall Pumpkin Scones

Advertisements

About Frances Wiedenhoeft

Over the first 22 years of my military career I served with the 44th General Hospital in Lanstuhl Germany for Operation Desert Storm, and with the 452nd CSH in Bagram Afghanistan for Operation Enduring Freedom, supporting the efforts of the 101st Airborne Division and the 10th Mountain Division. Nothing prepared me for the brutality I encountered on my deployment as anesthesia support to the 1872nd Head and Neck Surgical Team of the 332nd EMDG at the Ballad Airbase Hospital in Balad, Iraq. Out of the hundreds of critically ill and injured patients I cared for over my career the number and severity of injuries in Iraq, especially against civilians, were the most brutal and devastating war could inflict. For most of both wars the Balad Airbase Hospital was the busiest trauma center in the combat zone. When not deployed I honed my skills at Wisconsin's Level I Trauma Center, the University of Wisconsin Hospital. (1994-2009) While there, in addition to a full anesthesia caseload I performed my own original clinical research on Single Dose Epidural Morphine in Gynecologic Oncology Surgery which was published in American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Journal 1999. I hold a Certification in Nurse Anesthesia from the Minneapolis VA School of Anesthesia (1994), a MA in Human Resource Development from the University of St. Thomas (1994) and a BS in Nursing from the University of Wisconsin (1984). I completed military education through Command and General Staff College. Since retiring from anesthesia in 2009 I attended Madison College where I studied Journalism and creative writing. I write in a variety of genres. I have published academic articles Staphylococcus Aureus Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Related Infections: A Cause of Catheter Loss and Peritonitis in Peritoneal Dialysis International, Phentolamine as a Diagnostic tool in Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy in Anesthesia and Analgesia and Single Dose Epidural Morphine in Gynecologic Oncology Surgery in the Journal of American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. My journalistic writing includes 20 years of guest editorials for The Wisconsin State Journal such as Return land to Ho-Chunk, Tribes seeking cooperation with the state and Honor a veteran; give of yourself. I worked as a staff writer for The Clarion while completing my journalism certificate contributing such articles as Candidates and your financial aid, A face in Wisconsin’s Electoral College: Fred Risser, and Dedicated to her game. I have published poetry related to her combat service online at warwriterscampaign.org and in print in the 2015 Ariel Anthology. I hold memberships in the National Writers Union, the Academy of American Poets, the Wisconsin Writers Association and the Wisconsin Fellowship of Poets. I have a passion for exploring social issues such as; the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the environment particularly water use and conservation, and healthy hearts and minds which I share online through my blog blogground.com. My enthusiasm for cooking and baking led me to create Bubbe’s Nightly Feast: For Cooks Who Are Afraid of Their Kitchens at bubbesnightlyfeast@wordpress.com where I share simple healthy recipes designed for people short on cooking experience. I am also a regular photographic contributor to MadisonCommons.org

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s